Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Technology a Catalyst for Change

I have never been comfortable with the term "mastered." Some people will say that I am a master of technology because the word "technology" is in my job title. Others will say I am an iPad master because I am fluent and knowledgeable with using iPads in education or I have mastered the art of organization because I am super organized.  I like to think of it more along the lines of being comfortable with problem solving, learning, and failing...

Jeff Utecht writes that in todays world we have to become comfortable with always being a beginner.

"This is the world we live in. Things change, and change without warning. Yesterday I felt I was a very productive user of Gmail. Today I was a beginner. Today I had to learn, I had to play with a program that I had mastered and start over at being a beginner.
And….I’m OK with that because I realize I’m really never going to master anything again. I’m constantly working towards mastery but as soon as I think I have reached it, things change, progression comes, and I’m back at the beginning. I live in a state of prepetual beta."
 I don't know if you have to be comfortable with always being a beginner...I think it is being comfortable with not being "an expert" and having the "I think I can" mindset...a problem solving, curious, patient, teacher who is not afraid of failure = one powerful message being sent to students.

Change is hard...

4 comments:

  1. love that idea of accepting our world as being in perpetual beta ... and therefore, opening ourselves up for new and unknown experiences.
    Kevin

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  2. Thanks for the comment, Kevin. I agree our lives are in perpetual beta. Aren't new and unknown experiences the best part of learning? It's the journey not the destination that is so rewarding!

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  3. I love the idea of always being a beginner. It is such a positive perspective, especially in teaching. It goes hand in hand with being a lifetime learner. Mastery is so final; so stagnant.

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  4. Thank you for the comment, Kim. Mastery does seem so final, doesn't it. So important to be modeling that we are always learning...

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